MonaVie Contains Cancer Causing Ingredients

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Many MonaVie distributors may claim that it is a healthy drink. As we’ve seen, MonaVie lacks nutrition. However, upon further investigation of the ingredients it seems that MonaVie contains a known carcinogen – a cancer causing ingredient.

That ingredient is benzene. Now you might be thinking, “I have a bottle of MonaVie and I don’t see benzene on the label.” Sodium Benzoate + Vitamin C = Benzene:

“Sodium benzoate has already been the subject of concern about cancer because when mixed with the additive vitamin C in soft drinks, it causes benzene, a carcinogenic substance.”

Here’s the list of ingredients from a bottle of MonaVie :

You might have blow that up a bit to read it. However, you’ll see that sodium benzoate and vitamin C are clearly there.

The FDA has created a question and answer for such products. It has tested quite a few products, but it has not tested MonaVie.

In any case, a wise consumer should avoid any “health” drink that has unknown dangers like proven cancer causing ingredients. MonaVie would fit into that category.

Originally posted 2011-09-20 12:54:59. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The above article is intended to be accurate at the time of its original posting. MonaVie may change its pricing, product, or other policies at any time without notice.

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51 Responses to “MonaVie Contains Cancer Causing Ingredients”
  1. Great people Says:

    Wow, I love this site. I have a couple of questions. Where did The blogs owner and Vogal get a PHD? Does anyone who is bashing on this site take any perscrition drugs? If you do, why. Read the precaustions. Those things can kill you. Do you eat out at all? Do you drive in a car. MMM that new car smell. It will kill you. I can find people who hate every store and product in america. Some people love one doctor and others hate him. That is what makes this country great. I have heard that living close to power lines can cause health issue’s. Should we shut down all power stations. Gee that might hurt this site. You say it take very little time to come up with you post. What do you do with your other time? Help feed the poor or homeless, help build homes? Anything that would help others? Just a few thoughts from someone who thinks it is people like these negative people who are killing America.

  2. MonaVie Scam Says:

    I’m glad you like the site Great People.

    Our Ph. D. location is undisclosed because we don’t want you to rely on the reputation on an academic institution. Instead you should read each article and follow the logic and/or reputable citation that are in the article itself. That’s much more reliable than someone saying, “I went to school at [X] University and you must believe me.” Don’t believe people who make such claims because they are likely to be lying or simply mistaken.

    It is unfortunate that many people visiting this website are against prescription medications for the reason that you mention. So many people say, “There are too many side effects.” I made the point that cars can kill people too. You can read that discussion here: Food Matters and MonaVie. It’s great to see that you agree with me.

    Those people always neglect to mention that cars and medicine help people. For example a car will get to a location that they need to earn a living. A couch may be safer in that it won’t get into a car accident, but it won’t actually perform the function necessary. Medicine is the same way. It is clinically shown to help people with a medical condition. Juice may be safer in that you won’t get any side effects (unless you are allergic or the product has a carcinogen in it like MonaVie), but it won’t help people with a medical condition.

    You lost me on the other analogies. I’m not quite sure what finding people who hate every store or product in America means. I’m not sure why you care whether some people like some doctors and some people hate the same doctor. These things don’t have anything to do with why MonaVie would choose to add a carcinogen to their products… carcinogens don’t have any positive aspect to them like helping us like prescription medicine, automobile transportation, or an electronic power grid.

    Thanks for your concern about what I’m doing to help people in my other free time. It isn’t relevant to the topic of this article.

  3. Mackwiz Says:

    “Great People” was trying to get you to shut up by saying there’s much worse things out there, such as homeless and hunger as if there’s no point in taking an issue with something if it is not the #1 problem facing society.

    I’ve noticed this from distributors. They love to go on and on about how superstar MonaVie and TEAM is, with the Inc. 500 and all that crap, but when they get criticized they ridicule by saying we are attacking a niche thing no one cares about, with the whole “why do you care so much” argument.

  4. Tyson and Margarita Maltby Says:

    [Editor’s note: Distributors name taken from the URL they left. This isn’t a place to promote your MonaVie business…]

    I am going to copy and paste a quote from 2008 after I share this with you guys. I was in the MonaVie CMO’s (Chief Marketing Officer) home Sept 2011 for a my first Tasting Party. I wanted to see if this thing is for real; besides having worked for Turner Broadcasting Network and Kellogg this guy has more credibility than anyone in this blog. Checking in from MonaVie’s recent regional meeting in Vancouver, Canada, Founder, Chairman, and CEO Dallin A. Larsen shared his thoughts about MonaVie’s rankings on Inc. magazine’s 28th annual Inc. 500 list.

    [Editor’s note: Please don’t cut and paste content from another website here. Also please familiarize yourself with MonaVie and the Inc Magazine 500.]

  5. Tyson and Margarita Maltby Says:

    I forgot to mention the CMO’s name by accident. It is Jeff Cohen and you can follow the links at my website to the offical Monavie website for more information. I copied and pasted his bio here’

    [Editor’s note: Please don’t cut and paste content from another website here. People can read about the MonaVie CMO if they are interested. They know to look at MonaVie’s website.]

  6. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Thanks for the comments Tyson and Margarita.

    This information is publicly available so you don’t need to cut and paste it here. It isn’t on the topic of MonaVie and its cancer causing ingredients.

  7. Derek Says:

    You neglected to mention that, as is the case with almost any drink that contains benzine, the benzene levels are below those considered dangerous for consumption. Don’t worry, I’m sure you’ll have a valid argument against MonaVie at some point. In the meantime, you can still believe man never walked on the moon.

  8. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Derek, perhaps you can give us the levels of benzene in MonaVie. I haven’t seen the company or even another third party publish such information.

    Also, who are you to speak for what everyone’s opinion is on what is “considered dangerous for consumption.”

    Perhaps you are one of those people who want companies to add cancer causing ingredients to their health drinks. It sounds like you are. Personally, I’ll choose from the hundreds, perhaps thousands, of other options out there that don’t have this risk.

  9. MadScientistMatt Says:

    If this were any other beverage, I would doubt it contained enough benzene to have any health effects. However, this is MonaVie we’re talking about, the beverage that somehow manages to pack 13 servings of fruit into a two ounce serving! Clearly, MonaVie has some sort of mysterious effect that renders it exempt from normal laws of chemistry and magnifies the power of any chemicals in it far beyond anything that their concentrations should do. Who knows what this mysterious effect would do to the benzene in it? It could turn the tiny amount of benzene into 13 times the OSHA Permitted Exposure Level.

    Live by the nonsense health claim, die by the nonsense health claim.

  10. Chet Says:

    Right at the bottom of the FDA thing:

    Because the TDS benzene results appeared to be unreliable, FDA scientists recommend that the benzene data be viewed with great caution while FDA considers removing TDS benzene data from the TDS website.

    FDA believes that the results of CFSAN’s recent survey indicate that the levels of benzene found in soft drinks do not pose a safety concern.

  11. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Chet,

    It is important to note that studies on soft drinks don’t apply to MonaVie. They typically don’t contain vitamin C – half of the benzene equation. MonaVie has added sodium benzoate and vitamin C.

    There’s no need to subject yourself to this risk in your health food. There are abundant other juices available at much lower cost that avoid this risk.

  12. Chet Says:

    They didn’t add vitamin C or the label would have to read ascorbic acid. I’d be more worried about the fact that gasoline is 1% benzene and it’s most carcinogenic when inhaled… Does monavie come in tinted glass containers?

  13. Chet Says:

    Putting gas in your car is probably equal to ten lifetimes of monavie benzene exposure.

  14. MonaVie Scam Says:

    The addition of vitamin C to MonaVie has been discussed elsewhere. However, the point of whether it is added or not isn’t fundamental to the article or discussion.

    As for benzene exposure of putting gas in your car, when you have presented independent analysis of each, we can further discuss it. In the meantime, the safest thing to do is to avoid MonaVie and choose a health drink without these risks, since many are available.

  15. Chet Says:

    Well your article doesn’t even remotely come close to proving that MonaVie has benzene in it. Whereas benzene is clearly up to 1.3% of gasoline.

  16. Chet Says:

    Plus the bottles are tinted and supposed to be kept cool or refrigerated, both the factors presented by the FDA to avoid benzene formation.

  17. MonaVie Scam Says:

    I don’t know anyone who drinks gasoline. I certainly wouldn’t recommend it. I’m pretty sure that the FDA doesn’t regulate gasoline for ingestion in any way. Your comparison is like apples and transmissions as my wife likes to say.

    According to MonaVie distributors the bottles aren’t shipped refrigerated, though the bottles say to refrigerate before and after opening, so one can’t depend on that. The bottle itself is tinted.

    There’s no downside with going with one of the many other drinks, again it’s simply not a risk taking. If you can show that there’s no vitamin C or sodium benzoate in MonaVie or that they can’t combine to form benzene then it’s worth discussing.

  18. Chet Says:

    The benzene exposure from gasoline is due to inhalation of the fumes. You don’t drink it.

  19. Chet Says:

    Elevated temperatures and light can stimulate benzene formation in the presence of benzoate salts and vitamin C, while sugar and EDTA salts inhibit benzene formation.

    Sugar inhibits the formation of benzene… hmm

  20. Chet Says:

    I showed the can’t combine because sugar is present!!! Case closed YAY!

  21. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Thanks you said this before. It’s not clear what amount, if any benzene is actually inhaled due to the open air nature of gas stations. At least it’s not clear to me without independent analysis. In addition, people generally fuel up only once a week or so – it’s not twice a day.

    In either event, if you are concerned about benzene form gas stations, perhaps you can pick up a N95 Particulate Respirator and reduce or eliminate that risk.

    However, that’s a topic for another website as it certainly doesn’t apply to MonaVie or benzene in juice.

  22. Chet Says:

    Any comment on the fact that sugar inhibits benzene formation?

  23. Chet Says:

    Hahaha how could a particulate filter block volatile gases?

  24. Chet Says:

    You overlooked a pretty big detail in that the study concluded that benzene formation did not occur in beverages containing sugar.

  25. MonaVie Scam Says:

    It seems to me that the FDA found benzene in sodas that had sugar in it. Seems like the case is still open.

    I suggested that N95 may help. I didn’t say that it definitely would. One could clearly get a gas mask that would help. It’s available for sale. Again, this isn’t the website for that information. I leave it to the reader to investigate that elsewhere.

  26. Chet Says:

    Which sugar sodas did they find it in?

    It is important to note that studies on soft drinks don’t apply to MonaVie.

  27. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Why wouldn’t soft drinks studies apply to MonaVie? Anything with vitamin C, sodium benzoate (or potentially potassium beznoate, I haven’t looked it because it’s not relevant to MonaVie), and sugar proves the point. Most soft drinks don’t have much or any vitamin C, so they tend not to show up anyway.

    Anyway, look up Giant Light Cranberry Juice Cocktail at http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/FoodContaminantsAdulteration/ChemicalContaminants/Benzene/ucm055815.htm. Here’s the nutritional information with 10g of sugar per serving: http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-giant-juice-cocktail-i254724.

  28. Chet Says:

    The data from the study you cited only showed increased benzene levels in diet and light beverages. The results of their study state that sugar prevented benzene formation. It’s also important to note that the only dangerous level benzene drinks were soft drinks.

  29. Chet Says:

    MonaVie Scam Says:
    December 10th, 2011 at 5:31 pm
    Chet,

    It is important to note that studies on soft drinks don’t apply to MonaVie.

  30. Chet Says:

    MonaVie Scam Says:
    December 12th, 2011 at 3:07 pm
    Why wouldn’t soft drinks studies apply to MonaVie?

    MonaVie Scam Says:
    December 10th, 2011 at 5:31 pm
    Chet,

    It is important to note that studies on soft drinks don’t apply to MonaVie.

  31. Chet Says:

    10g sugar per 8 oz is a lot less than 24g per 8 oz

  32. MonaVie Scam Says:

    You can’t answer my question for why soft drink studies wouldn’t apply to MonaVie with you own quote saying that they don’t apply. That’s a “Because I told you so” argument with no logic behind it.

    However, I am glad to see that you have conceded the fact that sugar doesn’t prevent the formation of benzene. Somewhat like this famous conversation about prostitution, we are now just trying to establish how much benzene is in MonaVie. I contend that we can’t know without it being tested.

    However, the fact still remains that there are numerous juices on the market for which this is not a potential issue at all because there’s combination of vitamin C and sodium benzoate. It’s like you are trying to defend a car that might have a faulty engine. You can argue until your face is blue that it might not be that faulty, but I’m going to go with the car and the engine that I know is guaranteed to not have that fault at all – because it was designed well from the start.

  33. Chet Says:

    That was your quote about soft drinks not applying!

    Monavie has 2.4 times more sugar that the juice you’re quoting with benzene. The juices that had as much sugar as Monavie had 1 or zero parts per billion.

    MonaVie Scam Says:
    December 10th, 2011 at 5:31 pm
    Chet,

    It is important to note that studies on soft drinks don’t apply to MonaVie. They typically don’t contain vitamin C – half of the benzene equation. MonaVie has added sodium benzoate and vitamin C.

    There’s no need to subject yourself to this risk in your health food. There are abundant other juices available at much lower cost that avoid this risk.

  34. Chet Says:

    The study clearly states:

    Elevated temperatures and light can stimulate benzene formation in the presence of benzoate salts and vitamin C, while sugar and EDTA salts inhibit benzene formation.

    SUGAR INHIBITS BENZENE FORMATION. PROTECTION FROM LIGHT AND HEAT INHIBIT BENZENE FORMATION. THE STUDY YOU ARE QUOTING CONFIRMED THAT THERE IS NO RISK DUE TO BENZENE IN DRINKS:

    The results of CFSAN’s survey indicate that the levels of benzene found in beverages to date do not pose a safety concern for consumers. Almost all samples analyzed in our survey contained either no benzene or levels below 5 ppb. Furthermore, benzene levels in hundreds of samples tested by national and international government agencies and the beverage industry are consistent with those found in our survey.

  35. MonaVie Scam Says:

    My quote about soft drinks not applying to MonaVie was the following:

    “It is important to note that studies on soft drinks don’t apply to MonaVie. They typically don’t contain vitamin C – half of the benzene equation. MonaVie has added sodium benzoate and vitamin C.”

    It wasn’t that soft drinks don’t apply, but due to the fact that they don’t typically have vitamin C – they are missing half of the benzene equation. So someone could say that a soft drink has sodium benzoate in it and studies on that soft drink would likely show that it is benzene-free because it doesn’t contain vitamin C. The point here is to establish drink with both the vitamin C and sodium benzoate in it.

    It may be true that sugar inhibits benzene, but it may be like how the police inhibit crimes. It slows it down, but it clearly doesn’t prevent it as we have real world examples and proof that sugar, sodium beznoate, vitamin C can coexist and still test positive for significant levels of benzene.

    We can’t logically argue about more sugar in MonaVie preventing benzene because we have no way of knowing how much sodium benzoate is in MonaVie.

    The point has been made dozens of times here that there’s no point in taking any kind of risk when there are versions without the risk readily available. You have not disputed this or addressed it.

  36. Chet Says:

    The point of the study is that there is no risk!

    The results of CFSAN’s survey indicate that the levels of benzene found in beverages to date do not pose a safety concern for consumers. Almost all samples analyzed in our survey contained either no benzene or levels below 5 ppb. Furthermore, benzene levels in hundreds of samples tested by national and international government agencies and the beverage industry are consistent with those found in our survey.

  37. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Chet said, “The point of the study is that there is no risk!”
    The study said, “Almost all samples analyzed in our survey contained either no benzene or levels below 5 ppb.” (The bold was added by me.)

    I hope you can see the difference between those two statements. Clearly there is risk and I showed an example of it. You can’t claim there is no risk. It’s like watching 100 cars go by outside your house and concluding that cars never break down or that there are never any accidents.

    You tried to show that vitamin c and sodium benzoate can’t combine to form benzene in the presence of sugar. You have failed. If you don’t have anything else to add, I think this dead horse has been beaten enough.

  38. Chet Says:

    Not a single full sugar fruit juice produced benzene (read the results of the study). Monavie is a full sugar juice.

  39. Chet Says:

    Stop comparing apples to transmissions with your analogies. ;)

    All cars break down.

    Only fruit juices and soft drinks with reduced sugar content have benzene.

  40. Chet Says:

    Perhaps you could explain your reasoning as to why MonaVie would be the only regular fruit juice to produce benzene. Made you could explain sodium benzoate decarboxylation and how it could occur without a light catalyst in a black bottle. Then you could explain how the reaction could overcome the hyperosmolarity of the solution caused by sugar saturation.

  41. Chet Says:

    Then you can explain the danger behind consuming a couple micro liters of benzene when the average daily consumption from normal atmospheric air is in the 400-3000 microliters per day.

  42. MonaVie Scam Says:

    You need to stop referring to the tests on other products and making assumptions that they apply to MonaVie.

    We don’t know how much sodium benzoate MonaVie adds. We know that sugar, vitamin C, and sodium benzoate can exist together and result in benzene. We know that there’s a risk of benzene in MonaVie.

  43. Akhil Says:

    jTCheeKz, yup. Why the hell is Monavie a MLM-Pyramid type of selling model ? If it’s so good, why don’t they sell it in streos, made available to the public the traditional way. Now friends have to go bug / irritate friends family and often come off as intrusive pushy even though they don’t intend to.See, you have to understand how it all works. Ridiculous amounts of people end up failing and screw themselves over and don’t succeed, just struggling to break even. And profiting ends up

  44. Raima Says:

    We had a distributor contact MonaVie like all people who have concerns regarding the product or service. This is MonaVie’s official response from their support team on sodium benzoate in MonaVie’s product.

    ————–

    Thank you for your email. The use and safety of sodium benzoate is widely accepted among reputable scientists and government agencies worldwide. It has been used in food products for over a century. Sodium benzoate has been approved for food use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); Food Standards Agency of the European Union; Food Standards Australia New Zealand; Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare; and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO). These organizations have carefully reviewed the available scientific literature on sodium benzoate to determine its safety for food use.

    Under certain circumstances, sodium benzoate can interact with vitamin C to form benzene, a substance that has been shown to be detrimental to human health when exposure is long-term, chronic, and in an occupational setting (e.g., a scientist who works with benzene on a regular basis). Benzene is naturally found in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and in soil.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has set safety standards for acceptable levels of benzene found in drinking water. The EPA’s standard is five parts per billion (ppb) for bottled drinking water. To help put this amount into perspective, five ppb is comparable to five drops of benzene found in 4,000 gallons of water.

    Consumer safety is very important to MonaVie. As an added safety precaution, MonaVie products are periodically tested for benzene. Our products are subjected to extreme conditions to mimic an environment where the production of benzene might flourish. MonaVie products consistently test well below these generally accepted levels of benzene for drinking water.

    I hope this information is helpful. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have additional questions or concerns.

  45. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Thanks Raima. It doesn’t look like MonaVie has employed any unbiased testing to continually test random bottles of juice for benzene. Of course they are going to downplay the issue, because they want to sell product.

    You don’t want to see sodium benzoate used products with vitamin C. It isn’t common and high quality products will avoid it.

  46. Interesting Says:

    Its very interesting how you left out the most important fact about Sodium Benzoate. Sodium Benzoate is not Benzene. It actually does not become Benzene until its combined with Ascorbic acid. When these are mixed it becomes the chemical Benzene which is a suspected carcinogen. I honestly could care less about MonaVie. What I do care about is the truth which is not the case in what you stated above.

  47. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Ascorbic acid is vitamin C and I quite clearly stated it in the article. I was being truthful and you were ignorant in not realizing that ascorbic acid is vitamin C.

  48. Raima Says:

    For those that are interested, we recently shared our concerns to Dr Shawn Talbott about the concerns of the amount of Sodium Benzoate found in MonaVie products.

    Dr. Shawn Talbott’s response was, the amount of Sodium Benzoate found in 4 cases of MonaVie (16 bottles), is the equivalent found in a small handful of natural Blue Berries.

    This helps put into perspective how much sodium benzoate is found in in MonaVie compared to a natural food.

    If you’re concerned about Sodium Benzoate, please check with your other food sources that you’re consuming to ensure the amounts that are within the safety levels.

    Everyone has the right to choose what they do or do not eat. No one is forcing anyone to drink MonaVie. Depending on an individual’s health condition, MonaVie may help some people more than others. Prevention is always better than intervention.

    If you’re concerned about a particular product, be sure to get your information from the source (in this case MonaVie), and be sure it’s reviewed in perspective.

    Any information found on the internet should not be treated as gospel. Be sure to do your due diligence to ensure the information is from a credible source.

    I hope this helps people who may have concerns.

  49. MonaVie Scam Says:

    Talbott works for MonaVie, so it would be best to share your concerns with an independent analyst. As this website has shown, MonaVie has openly lied about their product in the past (see: http://www.juicescam.com/monavie-lies-about-the-orac-score-of-monavie/).

    MonaVie adds sodium benzoate which is something that almost every other juice (in fact every juice that I know of) that has vitamin C has eliminated. Check the ingredients of your juice and see if it has sodium benzoate in it. You probably won’t find it.

    MonaVie doesn’t help prevent any health condition. In fact juice is bad for you: http://www.youtube.com/embed/hLv0Vsegmoo?rel=0&start=1723. Please don’t be billing MonaVie as helping some people more than others… placebos help some people more than others.

    Yes, no one is forcing anyone to drink MonaVie. They are just misleading, lying to people, and omitting important information with their marketing.

    It isn’t important to establish the source as credible as long as the information is credible when you’ve done your due diligence.

  50. Wendy Says:

    Within 2.5-4 years of drinking Monavie for health benefits, all three of the people consuming have all come down with cancer. Rare appendix, kidney and prostate cancers.

    Throw the stuff out. The chemistry explosion is harmful. Sodium benzoate and Vit c create benzene (gasoline). Not good for a healthy body. Eating the real food is always superior.

    Anyone else know of cancer in friends/family taking Monavie. I’m very curious and very sad.

 
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